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NYC Day 2

 

What a nice day!  We got up semi-early and went out for breakfast.  The first place wasn’t open yet so we ended up at Le Pain Quotidien, then to Michael’s apartment where we played piano a little then decided to take a Detour app trip called Ken Burns’ Brooklyn Bridge. It was just a tad weird that we took an Uber to go for a walk starting place but we did. 🙂

It was really fun.  The app used our location so it told us what we needed to know right where we were.

It started right near Bargemusic in Brooklyn. According to the New York City Department of Transportation, more than 120,000 vehicles, 4,000 pedestrians, and 3,100 cyclists cross the bridge each day.

The bridge first opened to the public in 1883 in a dedication ceremony presided over by President Chester A. Arthur and New York Governor Grover Cleveland. Any pedestrian with a penny for the toll was welcomed to cross—an estimated 250,000 people walked across the bridge in the first 24 hours—horses with riders were charged 5 cents, and it cost 10 cents for horse and wagons.

The following year, P. T. Barnum, of circus fame, led 21 elephants across the bridge in an attempt to quell public fears about its stability.

The pedestrian toll was repealed by 1891, along with the roadways toll in 1911, and the bridge crossing has been free to all ever since.

Tom took lots more picture but this will do for now 🙂

Then, after the briefest of naps, we went out for yummy Thai food at Thai Sliders and Co.

Uber back to our place to sit on “our” terrace from last night. Such a nice view 🙂

Busy day tomorrow so it’s time to say

Edinburgh’s Hogmanay Begins Tonight!

happy-new-year-ani

 

In Scotland, there are many unique customs associated with the New Year. These form the Scottish celebration Hogmanay—the Scots name for New Year’s Eve. The street party in Princes Street in Edinburgh is one famous example.

There are many customs, both national and local, associated with Hogmanay. The most widespread national custom is the practice of first-footing, which starts immediately after midnight. This involves being the first person to cross the threshold of a friend or neighbour and often involves the giving of symbolic gifts such as salt (less common today), coal, shortbread, whisky, and black bun (a rich fruit cake) intended to bring different kinds of luck to the householder. Food and drink (as the gifts) are then given to the guests.

This may go on throughout the early hours of the morning and well into the next day (although modern days see people visiting houses well into the middle of January). The first-foot is supposed to set the luck for the rest of the year. Traditionally, tall, dark men are preferred as the first-foot.

 

 

In Scottish folklore, the first-foot is the first person to enter the home of a household on New Year’s Day and a bringer of good fortune for the coming year.

Although it is acceptable in many places for the first-footer to be a resident of the house, they must not be in the house at the stroke of midnight in order to first-foot (thus going out of the house after midnight and then coming back in to the same house is not considered to be first-footing).

It is said to be desirable for the first-foot to be a tall, dark-haired male. A female or fair-haired male are in some places regarded as unlucky.

The first-foot usually brings several gifts, including perhaps a coin (silver is considered good luck), bread, salt, coal, or a drink (usually whiskey), which represent financial prosperity, food, flavor, warmth, and good cheer respectively.

 

 

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